Evolution and Global Warming are facts, not theories!

Hand Evolution by Megan Godtland

Science and Reason, use them to guide your life.

Microwave Earth by Megan Godtland

Scientists Stats

Sioux Falls Scientists Social Activities

Science at the Pub

Come and join the others who are intersted in science down at your local pub (or restaurant). This is where those of us interested in science, interested in evolution, interested in global warming and climate change, and Scientists and Free Thinkers, can get together, socialize, and tell everyone what recent science discoveries they find particularly interesting. They can also have some good food, and have a few drinks (food and drinks optional of course). Science at the Pub is a great opportunity to meet with like minded people, have great conversations, logical discussions, and expand your knowledge of the world around you. This event will be held about once a month at a local restaurant or pub in Sioux Falls.

Scientist's Potlucks and Picnics

Details will be determined by those interested in science, Scientists, Free Thinkers, and other open-minded persons, like yourself, during our organizational meetings.

Sioux Falls Scientists Organizational Meetings

Sioux Falls Scientists will have organizational meetings as needed. This gives you a chance to show up, meet everyone, and offer input on what future activities we may offer. This is also a time to suggest meetings at restaurants and pubs, potlucks, picnics, game nights, whatever you want to suggest.

Join the march in support of science!

4-23-17 In Pictures: Science marchers defy rain in Washington DC
In Pictures: Science marchers defy rain in Washington DC
Thousands joined the first-ever March for Science in the US capital, despite the rain. Thousands of scientists have taken part in demonstrations around the world in protest against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The main event was held in Washington DC in the United States. Thousands of protesters turned out despite the bad weather. Marchers came with plenty of protection against the rain. The event, timed to coincide with Earth Day, also called for action to protect the environment. Some protested against funding cuts for science and the environment. There was a festival atmosphere beside the Washington Monument, where a stage was erected for music and speeches. Organisers said it was a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Marchers wanted to demonstrate "the vital role science plays in our democracy".

4-22-17 Bill Nye the Science Guy says lawmakers are 'deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science'
Bill Nye the Science Guy says lawmakers are 'deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science'
"Without scientifically literate citizens, the United States — any country, in fact — cannot compete on the world stage," Bill Nye the Science Guy told a cheering crowd at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. "Yet today we have a great many lawmakers — not just here, but around the world — deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science. Their inclination is misguided, and in no one's best interest." Nye touted the ways scientific discoveries have improved global quality of life, arguing that science is not merely "purview of a different, or special, type of citizen." "Our numbers here today show the world that science is for all," he said, and government must come to recognize that "science serves every one of us." The Washington event where Nye spoke was one of more than 600 marches scheduled around the globe on Saturday. "I think the profession of science is under attack," said scientist Lucky Tran, who helped organize the rallies, in an interview with NPR. "We haven't engaged in politics, we've left that open for politicians to come in and really hijack and obfuscate science for their own selfish needs." (Webmaster's comment: The current government in Washington has only one use for Science, making things to kill, terrorise and torture people.)

4-22-17 On the ground in Washington at the March for Science
On the ground in Washington at the March for Science
Thousands rallied and marched in the rain in the US capital to stand up for science and its place in politics. Jonathan Berman, the national co-chair of the March for Science, said his hopes for the day of the march were that it wouldn’t rain and that lots of people would show up. He got one of those wishes. When we turned up to the National Mall in Washington, DC on Earth Day, we joined thousands of people gathering for a rally, a teach-in, and a march. The crowds streamed in through the gates for hours, standing in lines several city blocks long by midday. The morning was devoted to talks from a lineup of speakers, which included scientists, science communicators – including Bill Nye and Michael Mann – and young students aspiring to become an astronaut, an engineer, and a clean energy researcher. In the crowd, the feeling was jubilant and reverent. Cheers went up at the images of famous scientific pioneers and at every mention of a field of science from the podium. During a video showing images of the earth from space, rally-goers silently lifted their signs like lighters at a rock concert. In fact, if it weren’t for the protest signs, you might think you were at a music festival. Jon Batiste, the bandleader for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, gave people something to dance to with funk, soul, and jazz music between speakers. Questlove, the leader of The Roots, acted as emcee for part of the rally and spoke of his own support of science: “We need to make sure science belongs to the people. It should be out in the open.” He wasn’t the only representative of the arts. As part of a teach-in co-hosted by the Earth Day Network, the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University had a tent where people could make blackout poetry from scientific texts. (Webmaster's comment: The true creators of our modern world are finally speaking up.)

4-22-17 March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
Thousands of scientists have taken part in demonstrations around the world in protest against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The first-ever March for Science, which was timed to coincide with Earth Day, was aimed at promoting action to protect the environment. Organisers said it was a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. The main event was held in Washington DC. The event's promoters said the march in the US capital was not aimed against President Donald Trump, while adding that his administration had "catalysed" the movement. At the demonstration in Washington DC, Dr Jonathan Foley, the executive director of the California Academy of Sciences, said that research was being irrationally questioned, adding that attacks from politicians "amounted to oppression". "They're specifically targeting science that protects our health, our safety and the environment. Science that protects the most vulnerable among us," he said. "Some people will suffer, some could even die," Dr Foley added. From climate change and pollution to medicine, men and women who support science were motivated on Saturday by the coverage of the recent Women's March and are mobilising to make their concerns heard.

4-22-17 We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened
We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened
On April 22, 2017 — Earth Day — thousands of scientists, science advocates and general enthusiasts rallied on the grounds of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., at the first-ever March for Science. The organizers estimate that over 600 sister marches also occurred around the world. The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.” The March for Science took place next to the Washington Monument, opposite the White House. Grounds opened at 8 a.m. and filled up quickly. The rally featured an array of speakers from scientists to teachers to advocates. Some speakers seemed keenly aware of fears of mixing science and politics, a common criticism of the event over the last few months, and didn't shy away from the intersection. Physicist Rush Holt is the CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a sponsor of the march, and was a U.S. Congressman for 16 years. The rally also featured some pioneers of various sorts. Nancy Roman, aka "Mother Hubble," was the first woman to hold an executive position at NASA in the 1960s.

4-22-17 March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
Thousands of protesters around the world have taken part in the first-ever March for Science. Thousands of scientists are protesting in hundreds of cities around the world against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The first-ever March for Science, which has been timed to coincide with Earth Day, is aimed at promoting action to protect the environment. Organisers say it is also a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. The main event is due to take place later on Saturday in Washington DC. The event's promoters said the march in the US capital was not aimed against President Donald Trump, while adding that his administration had "catalysed" the movement. From climate change and pollution to medicine, men and women who support science have been motivated by the coverage of the recent Women's March and are mobilising to make their concerns heard.

4-22-17 Why I'm marching for science
Why I'm marching for science
A few months ago, the organizers of the D.C. March for Science announced a date for the rally: Earth Day, April 22nd, 2017. The event could very well end up being the largest demonstration of scientists in our nation's history — hundreds of satellite rallies are planned across the country. There are millions of supporters across Facebook and Twitter — and observers are drawing comparisons to the massive Women's March held the day after Donald Trump's inauguration. Since the March for Science is taking place on Earth Day, there will probably be a special focus on environmental science, and on the particular threats climate science faces under a Trump administration that's openly hostile to objective truths they don't like. But above all, organizers hope the March for Science will be a celebration of science and the fact that scientists are citizens too — acknowledging the enormous debt we owe to those who devote their lives to furthering human understanding. (One recent episode of my podcast, Warm Regards, focuses on the tension that scientists now face under Trump and how scientists form a key part of the resistance to a post-fact world.)

4-21-17 Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.
Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.
Dozens of speakers are scheduled to take the stage April 22 at the March for Science in Washington, D.C. Science News will be on the scene at the April 22 March for Science in Washington, D.C. Follow us on Twitter (@ScienceNews). The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.”

4-21-17 Here’s what to expect from Saturday’s March for Science
Here’s what to expect from Saturday’s March for Science
Despite criticisms of the organising committee and a perceived lack of a clear message, the march could be a turning point for how scientists approach government. The March for Science is set for tomorrow, when thousands are expected to descend on the National Mall in Washington DC. Hundreds of satellite marches are set to take place around the globe. Despite criticisms of the organising committee and a perceived lack of a clear message, it could be a turning point for how scientists approach government. In the days after the 2017 US presidential inauguration, resistance to the anti-science stance trumpeted during the 2016 campaign grew in online discussions on Reddit. Several people, including physiologist Jonathan Berman, proposed a march on Washington similar to the Women’s March in January. “There was this building desire among scientists to become more willing to enter into the political discussion, and we sort of got the timing right to become the fulcrum for that,” says Berman, who became one of the national organisers of the March for Science. Within a week of launching a website, the movement had gained a Twitter following of more than a million people, he says. On the morning of 22 April, environmental group the Earth Day Network will co-host a teach-in and rally near the Washington Monument, followed by the march through the streets ending at the US Capitol.

4-19-17 March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new level
March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new level
People rally not around a single issue but around science with a capital S. Thousands of pro-science citizens are expected to march in hundreds of cities April 22 during the first-of-its-kind March for Science. Scientists have been politically engaged in the past — here, supporters listen to scientists speaking out at a climate change rally in San Francisco in December — but historians are calling the upcoming march unprecedented. Lab coats aren’t typical garb for mass demonstrations, but they may be on full display April 22. That’s when thousands of scientists, science advocates and science-friendly citizens are expected to flood the streets in the March for Science. Billed by organizers as both a celebration of science and part of a movement to defend science’s vital role in society, the event will include rallies and demonstrations in Washington, D.C., and more than 400 other cities around the world. “Unprecedented,” says sociologist Kelly Moore, an expert on the intersection of science and politics at Loyola University Chicago. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.”

4-19-17 Marchers, raise your banners for the tortoise pace of progress
Marchers, raise your banners for the tortoise pace of progress
The March for Science reflects the growing gap between slow, steady, vital scientific gains and quick-fire, opportunist US politics, says Dave Levitan. A WEEK is a long time in politics. Science, however, is in it for the long haul. Whether planning for rising sea levels or isolating proteins in fruit fly nerve cells so that many years down the line we might have a new drug for Parkinson’s, it does not square with the day-to-day, fixed-term imperatives of government. This produces obfuscations from some politicians. They back fracking ventures that quickly create jobs, but talk down long-term pollution. Others take credit for renewable energy progress, conveniently ignoring the decades of work to get there. The slow march of scientific progress does not match well with politics even on a good day. And today is not a good day. Preliminary budget outlines from US president Donald Trump have shocked the science community. Everything from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to NASA’s earth science missions would get a buzz cut. In a way this makes perfect sense. The impulsivity and lack of long-term thinking that places science at odds with politics seems less a feature and more a tenet of Trump’s view. Why fund the NIH properly, helping to produce the medical advances of 2030, when you can’t see past your next tweet? If politics couldn’t handle science’s tortoise pace years ago, it should be no surprise to see this disdain reach a new peak in a faster-moving age. On the bright side is the response of scientists and the public. That includes open letters from thousands of scientists, political action committees aimed at bringing expertise to government – and of course 22 April’s March for Science in Washington DC and other cities in the US and around the world.

To find our local events check at Sioux Falls Free Thinkers on Meetup.com

Total Page Views

Sioux Falls Scientists Social Activities