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Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Quantum Mechanics for a making
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Quantum Mechanics
The Physics of the Microscopic World
Lectures by Professor Benjamin Schumacher

Quantum Mechanics (2009) - 24 lectures, 12 hours
Quantum Mechanics at TheGreatCourses.com

One day in 1900, German physicist Max Planck told his son that he had made a breakthrough as important as Isaac Newton's discovery of the workings of the universe. Planck had reached the surprising conclusion that light behaves as if it is packaged in discrete amounts, or quanta, a seemingly simple observation that would lead to a powerful new field of physics called quantum mechanics.

In the following decades, a series of great physicists built on Planck's discovery, including Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Louis de Broglie, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrödinger, Richard Feynman, and many others, developing quantum mechanics into the most successful physical theory ever devised—the general framework that underlies our understanding of nature at its most fundamental level.

Quantum mechanics gives us a picture of the world that is so radically counterintuitive that it has changed our perspective on reality itself, raising profound questions about concepts such as cause and effect, measurement, and information. Despite its seemingly mysterious nature, quantum mechanics has a broad range of applications in fields such as chemistry, computer science, and cryptography. It also plays an important role in the development and innovation of some of today's most amazing—and important—technologies, including lasers, transistors, microscopes, semiconductors, and computer chips.

Quantum Mechanics: The Physics of the Microscopic World gives you the logical tools to grasp the paradoxes and astonishing insights of quantum mechanics in 24 half-hour lectures designed specifically for nonscientists and taught by award-winning Professor Benjamin Schumacher of Kenyon College.

No comparable presentation of this subject is so deep, so challenging, and yet accessible. Quantum Mechanics is generously illustrated with diagrams, demonstrations, and experiments and is taught by a professor who is both a riveting lecturer and a pioneer in the field, for Professor Schumacher is an innovator in the exciting new discipline of quantum information.

Professor Benjamin Schumacher is a Professor of Physics at Kenyon College, where he has taught for 20 years. He was an undergraduate at Hendrix College and received his Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from The University of Texas at Austin in 1990. Professor Schumacher introduced the term "qubit", invented quantum data compression (also known as "Schumacher compression"), and established several fundamental results about the information capacity of quantum systems.

24 Lectures - 30 minutes each

1: The Quantum Enigma 13: Antisymmetric and Antisocial
2: The View from 1900 14: The Most Important Minus Sign in the World
3: Two Revolutionaries—Planck and Einstein 15: Entanglement
4: Particles of Light, Waves of Matter 16: Bell and Beyond
5: Standing Waves and Stable Atoms 17: All the Myriad Ways
6: Uncertainty 18: Much Ado about Nothing
7: Complementarity and the Great Debate 19: Quantum Cloning
8: Paradoxes of Interference 20: Quantum Cryptography
9: States, Amplitudes, and Probabilities 21: Bits, Qubits, and Ebits
10: Particles That Spin 22: Quantum Computers
11: Quantum Twins 23: Many Worlds or One?
12: The Gregarious Particles 24: The Great Smoky Dragon


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Quantum Mechanics
The Physics of the Microscopic World
Lectures by Professor Benjamin Schumacher

Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Quantum Mechanics for a making
a difficult subject understandable for the lay person.