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Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Poisoned Waters for showing that
unregulated industry, agriculture, and suburban development
continue to pollute and contaminate our water sources to
the point of unusability for humans or for other life.
Our water sources have become Poisoned!

Poisoned Waters

Poisoned Waters (2009) - 120 minutes
Poisoned Waters at Amazon.com

More than three decades after the Clean Water Act, two iconic waterways - the great coastal estuaries of Puget Sound and the Chesapeake Bay - are in perilous condition. With polluted runoff still flowing in from industry, agriculture and massive suburban development, scientists fear contamination to the food chain and drinking water for millions of people. A growing list of endangered species also is threatened in both estuaries. Poisoned Waters examines the rising hazards to human health and the ecosystem and why it's so hard to keep ours waters clean.

FRONTLINE examines the rising hazards to human health and eco-system, and why it's so hard to keep our waters clean. The coastal estuaries of Puget Sound and the Chesapeake Bay - are in perilous condition. Polluted runoff still flows in from industry, agriculture, and massive suburban development, and scientists fear contamination to the food chain, drinking water, as well as a growing list of endangered species.

9-17-16 Florida sinkhole causes huge waste water leak into aquifer
Florida sinkhole causes huge waste water leak into aquifer
About 980 million litres of contaminated water have leaked into Florida's main underground source of drinking water, state officials say. The leak occurred after a huge sinkhole opened up under a phosphate fertiliser plant near Tampa, damaging the stack where waste water was stored. The water contained phosphogypsum, a slightly radioactive by-product from the production of fertiliser. The phosphate company Mosaic said the leak posed no risk to the public. It added the contaminated water had not reached private supplies and the firm was recovering it using pumps. "Groundwater moves very slowly," senior Mosaic official David Jellerson was quoted as saying by the Associated Press news agency. However, Jacki Lopez, Florida director of the Center for Biological Diversity, told Reuters news agency: "It's hard to trust them when they say 'Don't worry,' when they've been keeping it secret for three weeks."

9-14-16 Our water is full of drugs and we don’t know their effects
Our water is full of drugs and we don’t know their effects
Water reuse means we are all consuming a cocktail of other people's leftover medicines, but measuring their impact is almost impossible. It's time we clean up our act. PICK up a glass, fill it from the tap and take a sip. You have just had a tiny dose of the pill your neighbour took days before. Excreted and flushed through our sewage works and waterways, drug molecules are all around us. A recent analysis of streams in the US detected an entire pharmacy: diabetic meds, muscle relaxants, opioids, antibiotics, antidepressants and more. Drugs have even been found in crops irrigated by treated waste water. The amounts that end up in your glass are minuscule, and won’t lay you low tomorrow. However, someone prescribed multiple drugs is more likely to experience side effects, and risks rise exponentially with each drug taken by a person over 65. So could tiny doses of dozens of drugs have an impact on your health? “We don’t know what it means if you have a lifelong uptake of drugs at very low concentrations,” says Klaus Kümmerer at the University of Lüneburg, Germany. “These drugs have been individually approved, but we haven’t studied what it means when they’re together in the same soup,” says Mae Wu at the National Resources Defense Council, a US advocacy group.

9-9-16 Myth busted: dumped pills aren’t main source of drugs in sewage
Myth busted: dumped pills aren’t main source of drugs in sewage
Waste water tests show the pharmaceuticals they contain are mainly excreted, suggesting that more expensive treatment may be needed to deal with them. The next time you pick up a prescription, you might notice a message on the label exhorting you not to flush leftover pills down the toilet. This advice reflects the official belief in some countries, including that dumping medicines down the toilet is the number one source of pharmaceutical contamination in waste water. The trouble is, it’s not true. “We’re not sure where this urban myth came from,” says Patrick Phillips at the US Geological Survey (USGS) in Troy, New York. Phillips’s latest work, together with Christine Vatovec at the University of Vermont and colleagues, seems to well and truly bust the myth. It also reveals some surprising sewer epidemiology. Why is it important to know the provenance of pharmaceuticals in waste water? They, and the compounds that result from mixing them, are becoming “chemicals of concern” – and only 50 per cent gets filtered out by treatment plants. The other 50 per cent could potentially end up in your drinking water.

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Poisoned Waters

Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Poisoned Waters for showing that
unregulated industry, agriculture, and suburban development
continue to pollute and contaminate our water sources to
the point of unusability for humans or for other life.
Our water sources have become Poisoned!