Evolution and Global Warming are facts, not theories!

Hand Evolution by Megan Godtland

Science and Reason, use them to guide your life.

Microwave Earth by Megan Godtland

Scientists Stats

Welcome to those interested in Science!


Global Warming Is A Fact! Climate Change Is A Fact!
Burning Fossil Fuels Is The Major Cause Of Global Warming!
Only 24 of 13,950 peer-reviewed climate articles reject climate change!
That's only 0.17 percent! Where would you place your bet?

Sioux Falls Scientists is a group made up of people who love science as well as those interested in science, and scientists themselves. This website provides news articles, movies, courses and books that describe how science works and the latest discoveries of science, especially the latest discoveries in the fields of evolution science and global warming. Located in Sioux Falls, SD, the Sioux Falls Scientists have meetings and social gatherings where people of free thought and open minds meet and share ideas, share what they have learned about science and share what they think about the latest science discoveries.

To become a member of this group join
Sioux Falls Free Thinkers on Meetup.com

Our meetings and social gatherings are posted at Sioux Falls Free Thinkers on Meetup.com. Sioux Falls Free Thinkers Upcoming Events can be seen on the Meetup.com Calendar.

Atheists/Humanists Meetup: Review Results of the Atheists/Humanists Evolution Billboards release

Location: Tomacelli's Pizza & Pasta, 2309 W 12th St, Saturday May 13th, 6:30 PM.

I'll have a Sioux Falls Atheists Sign on the table.

The billboards will have been up for as much as three weeks. The Creationist, Revisionist, Fundamentalist and Evangelist Witch Doctors (Preachers) will be frothing at the month.

I'll be sharing the support the billboards received as well as the attacks they received. In the past the results have been 3 to 1 in support. The Witch Doctors do not have the support of the people. They are a dying breed, but they can be good for a laugh.

Join us for laughs and good pizza and pasta.

You can see the first billboard "Witch Doctors Across The Ages!" here.

Dale Hemming: Founder, Sioux Falls Free Thinkers

The Sioux Falls Scientists group will never have any dues. Membership is not required to attend our meetings. This group will probably never have any formal rules except treating other members and their opinions with respect and giving everyone equal time to speak. This group will never purge members for expressing their opinions or for forming their own group of people interested in science in general or in a particular field of scientific study. The only loose requirement is that members, and those attending our meetings, have an interest in one of the subjects of the Sioux Falls Free Thinkers websites.

We look forward to seeing you at one or more of our events and meetings!

Join the march in support of science!

4-23-17 In Pictures: Science marchers defy rain in Washington DC
In Pictures: Science marchers defy rain in Washington DC
Thousands joined the first-ever March for Science in the US capital, despite the rain. Thousands of scientists have taken part in demonstrations around the world in protest against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The main event was held in Washington DC in the United States. Thousands of protesters turned out despite the bad weather. Marchers came with plenty of protection against the rain. The event, timed to coincide with Earth Day, also called for action to protect the environment. Some protested against funding cuts for science and the environment. There was a festival atmosphere beside the Washington Monument, where a stage was erected for music and speeches. Organisers said it was a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Marchers wanted to demonstrate "the vital role science plays in our democracy".

4-22-17 Bill Nye the Science Guy says lawmakers are 'deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science'
Bill Nye the Science Guy says lawmakers are 'deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science'
"Without scientifically literate citizens, the United States — any country, in fact — cannot compete on the world stage," Bill Nye the Science Guy told a cheering crowd at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. "Yet today we have a great many lawmakers — not just here, but around the world — deliberately ignoring and actively suppressing science. Their inclination is misguided, and in no one's best interest." Nye touted the ways scientific discoveries have improved global quality of life, arguing that science is not merely "purview of a different, or special, type of citizen." "Our numbers here today show the world that science is for all," he said, and government must come to recognize that "science serves every one of us." The Washington event where Nye spoke was one of more than 600 marches scheduled around the globe on Saturday. "I think the profession of science is under attack," said scientist Lucky Tran, who helped organize the rallies, in an interview with NPR. "We haven't engaged in politics, we've left that open for politicians to come in and really hijack and obfuscate science for their own selfish needs." (Webmaster's comment: The current government in Washington has only one use for Science, making things to kill, terrorise and torture people.)

4-22-17 On the ground in Washington at the March for Science
On the ground in Washington at the March for Science
Thousands rallied and marched in the rain in the US capital to stand up for science and its place in politics. Jonathan Berman, the national co-chair of the March for Science, said his hopes for the day of the march were that it wouldn’t rain and that lots of people would show up. He got one of those wishes. When we turned up to the National Mall in Washington, DC on Earth Day, we joined thousands of people gathering for a rally, a teach-in, and a march. The crowds streamed in through the gates for hours, standing in lines several city blocks long by midday. The morning was devoted to talks from a lineup of speakers, which included scientists, science communicators – including Bill Nye and Michael Mann – and young students aspiring to become an astronaut, an engineer, and a clean energy researcher. In the crowd, the feeling was jubilant and reverent. Cheers went up at the images of famous scientific pioneers and at every mention of a field of science from the podium. During a video showing images of the earth from space, rally-goers silently lifted their signs like lighters at a rock concert. In fact, if it weren’t for the protest signs, you might think you were at a music festival. Jon Batiste, the bandleader for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, gave people something to dance to with funk, soul, and jazz music between speakers. Questlove, the leader of The Roots, acted as emcee for part of the rally and spoke of his own support of science: “We need to make sure science belongs to the people. It should be out in the open.” He wasn’t the only representative of the arts. As part of a teach-in co-hosted by the Earth Day Network, the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University had a tent where people could make blackout poetry from scientific texts. (Webmaster's comment: The true creators of our modern world are finally speaking up.)

4-22-17 March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
Thousands of scientists have taken part in demonstrations around the world in protest against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The first-ever March for Science, which was timed to coincide with Earth Day, was aimed at promoting action to protect the environment. Organisers said it was a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. The main event was held in Washington DC. The event's promoters said the march in the US capital was not aimed against President Donald Trump, while adding that his administration had "catalysed" the movement. At the demonstration in Washington DC, Dr Jonathan Foley, the executive director of the California Academy of Sciences, said that research was being irrationally questioned, adding that attacks from politicians "amounted to oppression". "They're specifically targeting science that protects our health, our safety and the environment. Science that protects the most vulnerable among us," he said. "Some people will suffer, some could even die," Dr Foley added. From climate change and pollution to medicine, men and women who support science were motivated on Saturday by the coverage of the recent Women's March and are mobilising to make their concerns heard.

4-22-17 We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened
We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened
On April 22, 2017 — Earth Day — thousands of scientists, science advocates and general enthusiasts rallied on the grounds of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., at the first-ever March for Science. The organizers estimate that over 600 sister marches also occurred around the world. The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.” The March for Science took place next to the Washington Monument, opposite the White House. Grounds opened at 8 a.m. and filled up quickly. The rally featured an array of speakers from scientists to teachers to advocates. Some speakers seemed keenly aware of fears of mixing science and politics, a common criticism of the event over the last few months, and didn't shy away from the intersection. Physicist Rush Holt is the CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a sponsor of the march, and was a U.S. Congressman for 16 years. The rally also featured some pioneers of various sorts. Nancy Roman, aka "Mother Hubble," was the first woman to hold an executive position at NASA in the 1960s.

4-22-17 March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
March for Science: Rallies worldwide to protest against political interference
Thousands of protesters around the world have taken part in the first-ever March for Science. Thousands of scientists are protesting in hundreds of cities around the world against what they see as a global political assault on facts. The first-ever March for Science, which has been timed to coincide with Earth Day, is aimed at promoting action to protect the environment. Organisers say it is also a celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. The main event is due to take place later on Saturday in Washington DC. The event's promoters said the march in the US capital was not aimed against President Donald Trump, while adding that his administration had "catalysed" the movement. From climate change and pollution to medicine, men and women who support science have been motivated by the coverage of the recent Women's March and are mobilising to make their concerns heard.

4-22-17 Why I'm marching for science
Why I'm marching for science
A few months ago, the organizers of the D.C. March for Science announced a date for the rally: Earth Day, April 22nd, 2017. The event could very well end up being the largest demonstration of scientists in our nation's history — hundreds of satellite rallies are planned across the country. There are millions of supporters across Facebook and Twitter — and observers are drawing comparisons to the massive Women's March held the day after Donald Trump's inauguration. Since the March for Science is taking place on Earth Day, there will probably be a special focus on environmental science, and on the particular threats climate science faces under a Trump administration that's openly hostile to objective truths they don't like. But above all, organizers hope the March for Science will be a celebration of science and the fact that scientists are citizens too — acknowledging the enormous debt we owe to those who devote their lives to furthering human understanding. (One recent episode of my podcast, Warm Regards, focuses on the tension that scientists now face under Trump and how scientists form a key part of the resistance to a post-fact world.)

4-21-17 Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.
Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.
Dozens of speakers are scheduled to take the stage April 22 at the March for Science in Washington, D.C. Science News will be on the scene at the April 22 March for Science in Washington, D.C. Follow us on Twitter (@ScienceNews). The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.”

4-21-17 Here’s what to expect from Saturday’s March for Science
Here’s what to expect from Saturday’s March for Science
Despite criticisms of the organising committee and a perceived lack of a clear message, the march could be a turning point for how scientists approach government. The March for Science is set for tomorrow, when thousands are expected to descend on the National Mall in Washington DC. Hundreds of satellite marches are set to take place around the globe. Despite criticisms of the organising committee and a perceived lack of a clear message, it could be a turning point for how scientists approach government. In the days after the 2017 US presidential inauguration, resistance to the anti-science stance trumpeted during the 2016 campaign grew in online discussions on Reddit. Several people, including physiologist Jonathan Berman, proposed a march on Washington similar to the Women’s March in January. “There was this building desire among scientists to become more willing to enter into the political discussion, and we sort of got the timing right to become the fulcrum for that,” says Berman, who became one of the national organisers of the March for Science. Within a week of launching a website, the movement had gained a Twitter following of more than a million people, he says. On the morning of 22 April, environmental group the Earth Day Network will co-host a teach-in and rally near the Washington Monument, followed by the march through the streets ending at the US Capitol.

4-19-17 March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new level
March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new level
People rally not around a single issue but around science with a capital S. Thousands of pro-science citizens are expected to march in hundreds of cities April 22 during the first-of-its-kind March for Science. Scientists have been politically engaged in the past — here, supporters listen to scientists speaking out at a climate change rally in San Francisco in December — but historians are calling the upcoming march unprecedented. Lab coats aren’t typical garb for mass demonstrations, but they may be on full display April 22. That’s when thousands of scientists, science advocates and science-friendly citizens are expected to flood the streets in the March for Science. Billed by organizers as both a celebration of science and part of a movement to defend science’s vital role in society, the event will include rallies and demonstrations in Washington, D.C., and more than 400 other cities around the world. “Unprecedented,” says sociologist Kelly Moore, an expert on the intersection of science and politics at Loyola University Chicago. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to the streets to collectively protest the government’s misuse and rejection of scientific expertise.”

4-19-17 Marchers, raise your banners for the tortoise pace of progress
Marchers, raise your banners for the tortoise pace of progress
The March for Science reflects the growing gap between slow, steady, vital scientific gains and quick-fire, opportunist US politics, says Dave Levitan. A WEEK is a long time in politics. Science, however, is in it for the long haul. Whether planning for rising sea levels or isolating proteins in fruit fly nerve cells so that many years down the line we might have a new drug for Parkinson’s, it does not square with the day-to-day, fixed-term imperatives of government. This produces obfuscations from some politicians. They back fracking ventures that quickly create jobs, but talk down long-term pollution. Others take credit for renewable energy progress, conveniently ignoring the decades of work to get there. The slow march of scientific progress does not match well with politics even on a good day. And today is not a good day. Preliminary budget outlines from US president Donald Trump have shocked the science community. Everything from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to NASA’s earth science missions would get a buzz cut. In a way this makes perfect sense. The impulsivity and lack of long-term thinking that places science at odds with politics seems less a feature and more a tenet of Trump’s view. Why fund the NIH properly, helping to produce the medical advances of 2030, when you can’t see past your next tweet? If politics couldn’t handle science’s tortoise pace years ago, it should be no surprise to see this disdain reach a new peak in a faster-moving age. On the bright side is the response of scientists and the public. That includes open letters from thousands of scientists, political action committees aimed at bringing expertise to government – and of course 22 April’s March for Science in Washington DC and other cities in the US and around the world.

Vaccinations Save Lives In Many Ways!

3-15-17 See how bacterial blood infections in young kids plummeted after vaccines
See how bacterial blood infections in young kids plummeted after vaccines
Newcomer pneumococcal vaccines have led to huge reductions in blood infections among young children. To celebrate birthdays, my 2- and 4-year-old party animals got vaccinated. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough for the older one (thankfully combined into just two shots), and hepatitis A for the younger. Funnily enough, there were no tears. Just before the shots, we were talking about the tiny bits of harmless germs that would now be inside their bodies, teaching their immune systems how to fight off the harmful germs and keep their bodies healthy. I suspect my girls got caught up in the excitement and forgot to be scared. As I watched the vaccine needles go in, I was grateful for these medical marvels that clearly save lives. Yet the topic has become fraught for worried parents who want to keep their kids healthy. Celebrities, politicians and even some pediatricians argue that children today get too many vaccines too quickly, with potentially dangerous additives. Those fears have led to reductions in the number of kids who are vaccinated, and along with it, a resurgence of measles and other diseases that were previously kept in check. Doctors and scientists try to reduce those fears with good, hard data that show vaccines are absolutely some of the safest and most important tools we have to keep children healthy. A study published online March 10 in Pediatrics shows a particularly compelling piece of data on the impact of vaccines.

SOME REALLY BAD NEWS!

3-9-17 EPA boss says carbon dioxide not primary cause of climate change
EPA boss says carbon dioxide not primary cause of climate change
The statement from Scott Pruitt, the new head of the Environmental Protection Agency, contradicts all the scientific evidence. The new chief of the US Environmental Protection Agency has said he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt said measuring the effect of human activity on the climate is “very challenging” and that “there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact” of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. “So, no, I would not agree that (carbon dioxide) is a primary contributor to the global warming that we see,” Pruitt told CNBC’s Squawk Box. Pruitt’s view is at odds with mainstream climate science, including NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The two agencies reported in January that Earth’s 2016 temperatures were the warmest ever. The planet’s average surface temperature has risen by about 2 degrees F since the late 19th century, “a change driven largely by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere”, the agencies said in a joint statement. Environmental groups seized on Pruitt’s comments as evidence he is unfit for the office he holds. “The arsonist is now in charge of the fire department, and he seems happy to let the climate crisis burn out of control,” said Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune.

Climate Change Is Real. Donald Trump Thinks It's A Hoax.

4-4-17 CO2 set to hit levels not seen in 50 million years by 2050
CO2 set to hit levels not seen in 50 million years by 2050
We are pumping CO2 into the atmosphere so fast that by the middle of this century the gas could soar to its highest levels for 50 million years. We are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere so fast that it could soar to its highest level for at least 50 million years by the middle of this century. And that’s even worse news than it sounds, because the sun is hotter now than it was then. This is one of the conclusions of a study looking at how CO2 levels in the atmosphere have changed over the past half billion years and comparing that with future scenarios. “CO2 in the past was not as high as we thought,” says Gavin Foster at the University of Southampton in the UK. Thanks to bubbles of air trapped in Antarctic ice, we have a good picture of CO2 levels over the past 800,000 years. But going further back in time is much more challenging. Foster and his colleagues have compiled data from more than 100 different studies to produce the best estimate yet of how CO2 levels changed in the past 420 million years. Among other things, the researchers corrected for the fact that studies based on carbonates in fossil soils are now known to have overestimated past CO2 levels. Their compilation suggests that the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere never rose above 3000 parts per million during this time period, whereas some earlier studies have suggested levels were as high as 5000 ppm at times. And by looking at future CO2 emission scenarios, they say the level will soon reach its highest for at least 50 million years. What’s not in doubt is that when CO2 levels were higher than in pre-industrial times, the planet was much warmer and had no ice at the poles. (Webmaster's comment: This is how the human race will end. The great frying!)

3-3-17 First yearly CO2 forecast predicts one of biggest rises ever
First yearly CO2 forecast predicts one of biggest rises ever
The forecast suggests levels of the greenhouse gas could briefly pass 410 parts per million in May, just four years after first passing 400 ppm. Now for the carbon dioxide forecast: levels of this gas in the atmosphere will rise by 2.5 parts per million to average 408 ppm in 2017. And the monthly average could exceed 410 ppm for the first time during this year’s peak in May (CO2 levels rise and fall each year with seasonal changes in plant growth). The precise forecast is 409.86 plus or minus 0.61 ppm. It is just four years since the peak level of CO2 first exceeded the troubling milestone of 400 ppm. If its concentration keeps rising at this rate, it will double compared with pre-industrial times well before the end of the century. A doubling of CO2 will warm the planet by about 3°C in the following decades, and by up to 6°C over the next few centuries. The prediction of a 2.5 ppm rise this year is the first ever official CO2 forecast by the UK’s Met Office. It was actually made last November, but the weather organisation has only just made it public. “We were able to successfully forecast the record CO2 rise that we saw last year,” says Richard Betts, who leads research into climate impacts at the Met Office Hadley Centre. “Now we’re getting happier with the method, we are going to start to do it as a routine forecast every year.” The forecast is specifically for Mauna Loa in Hawaii, where CO2 levels have been monitored since the 1950s, providing plenty of fodder for forecasters. Levels at other sites can differ slightly. CO2 is the main greenhouse gas responsible for warming the planet. Prior to the industrial age, levels in the atmosphere were around 280 ppm – and had remained below 300 ppm for at least 800,000 years. Now they have shot up to more than 400 ppm. (Webmaster's comment: And the world is trying to do something about, but not Donald Trump's America!)

Donald Trump's Plan: Gut The EPA

3-3-17 US drinking water at risk from Trump’s cuts to pollution rules
US drinking water at risk from Trump’s cuts to pollution rules
By dismantling guidelines designed to protect US waterways from pollution, Trump is shifting the problem downstream – and leaving the taxpayer to pay for it. It’s difficult to square the rhetoric with the action. On 28 February, Trump signed an executive order restricting which bodies of water are subject to pollution regulations. Just hours later, he told Congress his administration aims to “promote clean air and clean water”. For more than a third of Americans, drinking water comes from streams or rivers, which don’t stop at state boundaries. Removing the power of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to enforce clean water laws will just push those responsibilities onto individual states. The Waters of the United States rule was added to the Clean Water Act of 1972 under the Obama Administration in 2015. It expands the EPA’s purview from “navigable” waters to any continuous flow of water. If the rule is dismantled, Trump’s speech was just politics and not policy. Leaving pollution standards up to individual states could mean that pollution from one state’s lax laws could disproportionately affect neighbouring states that share waterways. “How land is managed in one state will affect what happens downstream,” says Durelle Scott at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg. “When we think about water management, we have to think about the entire watershed.” (Webmaster's comment: Clean drinking water will soon be a thing of the past thanks to Donald Trump! Your children's lives are at serious risk!)

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Welcome to those interested in Science!.